We Applaud EnviroMetro's Priorities For New Transportation Funding Measure

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A new coalition of 20 environmental organizations named EnviroMetro has signed on to a letter that outlines priorities for a possible 2016 sales tax measure for transportation, and we enthusiastically applaud their choices, including “an explicit goal of increasing funding for public transit and active transportation and lowering drive-alone trips”! Their priorities are to:

  • Give preference only to projects that are either GHG-neutral or that reduce GHG emissions . . . no projects that increase vehicle travel should be funded
  • Target funding for, prioritize multi-benefit projects in, and avoid burdening “disadvantaged communities” already disproportionately burdened by multiple sources of pollution
  • Prioritize multi-benefit projects such as cool pavements, increased tree canopy, and shaded transit stops to help cool down entire neighborhoods, reduce urban heat island effects, and improve air quality
  • Integrate natural assets into a first-last-mile strategy
  • Incorporate green infrastructure and biological mitigation for projects into funding measure

 Here's more detail from the letter or read the letter here:

  • Reduce GHG emissions: “Preference should be given to projects that reduce GHGs, are GHG-neutral, or enhance the region’s multimodal network . . . No projects that induce additional vehicle travel, such as most new freeways or additional roadway capacity projects, should be funded.”
    • The letter cites a AQMD study that finds the transportation sector accounts for up to 85% of criteria and ozone precursor emissions in the South Coast Basin.
    • The letter also points out that asthma rates have gone up in the last decade for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black children, who have the highest rates of asthma (25%), compared to Hispanic children (8%), non-Hispanic White children (7%) and Asian/Pacific Islander children (4%). In order to address this problem the Centers for Disease Control recommends more investment in transit, more strategies to boost ridership, more transit-oriented development, and more resources for multi-modal transportation
    • And the letter cites a report by the University of California and the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, which found a significant shift to public transit and active transportation  coupled with a decrease in road construction, parking garages and other things that encourage car ownership results in a 40% reduction in GHG emissions.
  • Fund deployment of zero- and near-zero-emissions freight technologies.
  • Target funding for, prioritize multi-benefit projects in, and avoid burdening “disadvantaged communities” already disproportionately burdened by multiple sources of pollution.
    • The letter points out that low-income communities and communities of color are already exposed to the highest rates of transportation-generated pollution and consequently suffer from higher rates of asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), obesity and other chronic illnesses.
  • Prioritize multi-benefit projects such as cool pavements, increased tree canopy, and shaded transit stops to help cool down entire neighborhoods, reduce urban heat island effects and improve air quality . . . “require every new transportation project to demonstrate how it will lower air pollution in disadvantaged communities . . . projects should also mitigate against displacement of local businesses, people of color and other low-income residents.”
  • Integrate natural assets into a first-last-mile strategy . . . “The region’s urban river corridors are strategically located to serve as key non-vehicular transportation corridors, as safe routes to school and first-last-mile connections providing a multi-objective green infrastructure network.”
  • Incorporate green infrastructure and biological mitigating for projects by including a stormwater runoff capture and management element in transportation plans to protect this potential water supply, for example, and using permeable surfaces where possi ble in the construction of new projects, facilities and parking lots . . .  “Similarly natural habitats should be protected from construction impacts.”
  • commented 2015-08-07 09:59:44 -0700
    WHERE IS SIERRA CLUB – Angeles Chptr., Transportation Comte??. Last night with some discussion and mentioning was made about EnviroMetro – and LRTP and Measure R-2 with my “Logistics Pavement Troika”…..coming to our Measure R-2 near you – 2016

    Metro is packing lots of “Call-For-Projects”-type projects everywhere in order to get local support for Nov.1,2016….This is to use lines of other minor projects then add the Logistics Troika – I-710 South / SR-710 North / High Desert Corridor and many secondary associates – Pavement Rehabilitation on I-710 Central and I-210 North, and I-5/210-SR14).

    New Troika freeway pavement in Meas.R-2 = 2+ X 20mi = 40 ln-mi, + 6+ln 8mi =50ln-mi + 60+mi X 6ln = 360ln mi = TTL 450 lane-miles of NEW FREEWAY PAVEMENT
    VS
    Say 225 mi of dual tracks or enough for two full rail transit circles connecting all existing rail transit (squaring the star)
    Costs for Measure R-2 <$1B for all three because they will be PPPs (OBTW $10B + $7B + $8B = $25-30B of capital – Public Private Partnerships)

    SO 2016 will be Metro’s/Phil’s Year for Return Of The Freeways…
    So where is SC-AC on Pavement Program in the Measure R-2 and on EnviroMetro program ….

    In El Sereno as alternative to SR-710 – we propose DASH within 3 blocks/1500ft, with three new local MTA lines, increased regional MTAs, with 8-10 BRsTs, and maybe N-S LRT from Gold Line North to Blue Line (LB)…and Park-N-Rides at LACity line with San Gabriel Valley.

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