Who Supports Measure H, the Campaign to End Homelessness in LA County?

kids.jpg 

Measure H, the "Los Angeles County Plan to Prevent and Combat Homelessness" is the March 7 ballot measure that will end homelessness for 45,000 people across LA County, including women and children, veterans, seniors, foster youth, and the disabled. The average person in LA County would pay a little more than $1/month to help end homelessness in LA County! Here are 60 endorsers so far!

A Community of Friends   American Academy of Social Work   Bend the Arc   Beverly Hills/Greater LA Association of Realtors   California Community Foundation   Central City Association   Children Now   Children's Defense Fund   Chrysalis   City of Santa Monica   Climate Resolve   Community Corporation of Santa Monica   CSH/Corporation for Supportive Housing   Diverse Strategies for Organizing   Downtown Women's Center   EAH Housing   East San Gabriel Valley Coalition for the Homeless   Enterprise Community Partners   Epath   FAST   Good Seed Community Development Corporation   Hollywood Entertainment District/Hollywood Property Owners Alliance   IBEW Local 11   Inner City Law   Integrated Recovery Network   Jovenes, Inc.   LA Area Chamber of Commerce   LA Family Housing   Los Angeles Business Council   Los Angeles Community College District   Mental Health America of Los Angeles   Move LA   National Alliance on Mental Illness   National Center of Excellence in Homeless Services   New Direction for Veterans   One LA   OPCC   Pacoima Beautiful   PATH   River LA   Safe Place for Youth   SEIU 721   Shelter Partnership, Inc.   Skid Row Housing Trust    South Bay Coaltion to End Homelessness   Southern California Association of Nonprofit Housing   Southern California Health & Rehab Program   Special Service for Groups/HOPICS   SRO Housing Corporation    St. Anne's   St. Joseph Center   Sunset & Vine BID/Central Hollywood Coalition   UFCW Local 1442   UFCW Local 770   Union Station Homeless Services   Unite Here Local 11   Upward Bound House   US Veterans Initiative Worksite   Wellness LA


LA's Low Income EV Carshare Could Be A Very Big Deal

EVCarshare.jpg

(Photo of state Senate Pro Tem Kevin de Leon flanked by Matt Petersen [behind to left] and Susana Reyes [right] from the LA Mayor's Office of Sustainability, and Sharon Feigon [left] of the Shared Use Mobility Center at a press conference last summer when grant for low-income EV carshare was announced.)

The LA City Council’s approval on Dec. 13 of the contract to begin LA's low-income electric vehicle carsharing program is exciting for many reasons, including that it once again proves California is a climate change leader and is investing Cap & Trade dollars in LA's low-income neighborhoods. More reasons:

  • Carsharing programs haven’t scaled up in LA to the degree they have in San Francisco, Washington DC, Chicago or Austin—for example—for reasons that aren’t well understood.
  • Very few low-income carsharing programs in the US have succeeded—but LA’s project involves the 2 people who operated the 2 most successful low-income programs (Sharon Feigon and Creighton Randall—more below).
  • EV carsharing, which requires the installation of significant EV car-charging infrastructure, has never been done in the US, but the company working with us in LA has run a very successful EV carsharing program in Paris (the Bollore Group and Autolib—more below).

The 100 electric vehicles and 200 charging stations will be located in low income neighborhoods in downtown LA, Pico Union, Westlake and Koreatown. The cost for low-income households to join is discounted: $3-$4 per month for a membership, depending on income, and $3-$4 per 20 minutes of use—relatively inexpensive if one compares it to taking a 20 minute ride with Lyft or Uber.

Read more

3 Ways LA’s Electric Carsharing Pilot is Setting the Urban Sustainability Agenda

AutolibBollore.jpg

Written by Creighton Randall, the Shared Use Mobility Center's Program and Development Director (Photo is of the Bollore Group's Autolib EV carshare program in Paris—with 4,000 cars!)

The City of Los Angeles made a big step forward for innovative, equitable mobility this week when the LA City Council authorized a contract with operator BlueCalifornia, a subsidiary of Bollorè Group, to run an electric carsharing program in disadvantaged neighborhoods in central Los Angeles. The program is supported by $1.67 million in grant funds from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and $1.82 million in EV infrastructure rebates, fee waivers, and in-kind support from the city.

More importantly, it contains several unique elements – from the myriad of benefits it promises to the wide array of partners it involves – that make the pilot truly the first of its kind in the nation.

A great deal of effort, commitment and hard work will still be needed to ensure the project delivers on its objectives. But we think it’s safe to say that, as other cities across the nation look for ways to expand transportation options for their residents, they would do well to follow LA’s example.

Here are 3 reasons why LA’s EV carshare pilot is helping to set the agenda when it comes to urban sustainability and shared mobility:

Read more

LA City Council Approves Contract for Low-Income EV Carshare Project!

Team.jpg

Today the LA City Council approved a contract with Blue California to operate a low-income EV carshare program in DTLA, Pico Union, Westlake & Koreatown with 100 EVs & 200 charging stations!!! Thank you City of LA!!! Here's a part of the team, which includes the LA Mayor's Office of Sustainability, LADOT, Blue California, the Shared Use Mobility Center, NRDC Urban Solutions, Sierra Club & Move LA! Missing: TRUST South LA, KIWA (Korean Immigrant Workers Alliance) & SALEF (the Salvadoran American Leadership and Education Fund). Got a happy holiday feeling!


LA City Council Hopefully Considers Low-Income Electric Vehicle Carshare Contract Tuesday

BestMedia.JPG

There was lots of media at the press conference in July 2015 when CA Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon announced that LA had won a $1.67 million grant from the CA Air Resources Board to launch a low-income electric vehicle carsharing program. Fast forward--wait--that's slow forward to Dec. 12, 2016 and the LA City Council's Transportation Committee is only now voting whether to approve the contract. Why does Los Angeles continue to be such a difficult place for carsharing? Here is the letter of support that I wrote to the Transportation Committee. If it's a YES vote the contract will come up for a vote at the City Council Tuesday morning (as in tomorrow). Move LA urges a YES vote Councilmembers Bonin, Koretz, Huizar, Martinez and Ryu!!!



LA County Supervisors Put 1/4 Cent Sales Tax Measure on March Ballot to Fund Homeless Services

BoardSupes.jpg

Move LA has been working with LA County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas and advocates for people who are homeless to build support for a permanent source of funding for the LA County Homeless Initiative and the comprehensive plan it outlines. We were very pleased with the turnout Tuesday at the Board of Supervisors meeting, where nearly 100 speakers lined up to ask the Board of Supervisors to put a 1/4-cent sales tax on the ballot that could raise about $355 million a year over its 10-year lifespan to fund supportive services and housing. The board voted unanimously to do so. This is some of the news coverage:

LA TimesDaily NewsSouthern California Public RadioBusinessmagz.comlawestmedia.com.


LA Times: Get Ready for Measure M!

RentersProtest.jpg

Great editorial from the LA Times about how Measure M projects may eventually triple the number of transit riders in LA County, and how these projects might also radically change the communities where new rail lines and stations are located—for better and for worse: While some neighborhoods may welcome the investment and real estate boom likely to occur in neighborhoods near transit, others have a legitimate fear that longtime residents will be pushed out. This is a big concern for Metro and for transit riders since low-income Angelenos make up 80% of Metro's ridership . . . (Photo: Renters gather outside the Apartment Association of Greater Los Angeles to demonstrate against evictions, rent increases, displacement and gentrification on Sept. 22.) READ MORE.


Denny Zane in the LA Times: Fortune—and LA Voters—Favor the Bold

PostMPresser.jpg

Los Angeles voters were in an especially giving mood. (Photo: Press at the post-victory Measure M press conference.)

Four major tax measures, clustered near the bottom of the ballot, sailed to victory in Los Angeles on election day, mostly by dizzying margins.

Voters embraced $94 million per year for parks, $1.2 billion to house the city’s homeless, $3.3 billion for community college facilities and a stunning $120 billion to pay for subways, light rail lines and other transit projects over 40 years. Those measures, backers say, will help Los Angeles tackle two of its most intractable problems — traffic and homelessness — and potentially reshape the region.

Read more in the LA Times.


Measure M Is for Our Kids

 IMG_4254.jpg

I have been excitedly talking about Measure M with friends and family ever since it was announced as the ballot initiative for traffic reduction in LA County. While almost everyone is supportive, a few people have candidly told me that they believe they will never see the benefits of Measure M in their lifetime.

I get what they are saying. Project completion dates like 2029 and beyond seem far away, even for someone in their early thirties.

In reality, however, the "local return" funding that will be provided to all 88 cities in LA County will mean immediate road repairs, and recently announced public-private partnership agreements would accelerate major projects. While this answer addresses their concern, it isn’t the best answer. You see, Measure M is actually about my children because my kids love public transit. 

Read more


Donate Volunteer Find an Event

connect

get updates